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Modes Of Spore Transmission And Strategies For Prevention And Control Of Mycotoxins 

Modes Of Spore Transmission And Strategies For Prevention And Control Of Mycotoxins 

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Modes Of Spore Transmission And Strategies For Prevention And Control Of Mycotoxins

Modes Of Spore Transmission And Strategies For Prevention And Control Of Mycotoxins

Strategies For Prevention And Control Of Mycotoxins

Health Beyond Wealth

Airborne, wind, or indoor ventilation system, attachment to insect, or birds, thus transmitted from plants to plant or

animal to animals. 

Route of infection 

Ingestion/skin contact/inhalation.

Bloodstream and lymphatic system.

Inhibit protein synthesis

Damage macrophages system

Inhibit particle clearance of the lungs.

Health effects of mycotoxins 

Acute and chronic effects on both humans and livestock.

Acute toxicity

Chronic toxicity 

Mutagenic & teratogenic toxicity

Mycotoxins are believed to be among the most potent known carcinogens.

Physiological and pathological  changes

Food poisoning

Nausea and vomiting

Modes Of Spore Transmission And Strategies For Prevention And Control Of Mycotoxins

Also, Read Occurrence And Toxicity Of Major Mycotoxins

Headache

Reproductive and mammary Changes

Breast enlargement in boys

Role in cancer

Immune suppressors (Wilson et al;2002).

Strategies for Prevention and control of mycotoxins 

The prevention of mycotoxins in our environment is a big task.

In general, prevention of the contamination of fungi and their mycotoxins in agricultural commodities can be

divided into the following  levels:

Primary prevention: this level of prevention is the most important and effective plan for reducing fungal growth and

mycotoxin production, several practices include; development of fungal resistant varieties of the growing plants,

controls field infection by fungi of planting crops, making a schedule for suitable pre-harvest, harvest, and post-

harvest and using fungicide and preservatives against fungal growth.

Secondary prevention: if the invasion of some fungi begins in commodities at an early phase, this level of prevention

will then be required. Several measures are suggested as follows: stopping the growth of infested fungi by redrying

the products, removal of contaminated seeds, inactivation or detoxification of mycotoxins contaminated, and

protecting the stored product from any conditions which favor continuing fungal growth.

Tertiary prevention: once the product is heavily infested by toxic fungi, primary and secondary prevention

would not be then feasible.

This involves complete destruction of the contaminated product and destruction of mycotoxins to the minimal level.

(Dauarte,2000).

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